Thursday, February 2, 2017

Minto Semi-Detached Houses in the 1960s and the early 1970s

During the 1960s and early 1970s Minto built semi-detached houses in a few neighbouhoods inside the greenbelt, including Beacon Hill, Borden Farm, Briargreen, Parkwood Hills and Tanglewood. 

 Some were previously shared on an older post: Mid-Century Modern semi-detached houses in Parkwood HillsI am missing a few from this era, but here is everything I have from inside the greenbelt:
The facade of this design plays with solids and voids through blank walls and inset balconies. The result is visually interesting, but the small windows limit natural light in the living room. A while ago I posted on the blank walls that Minto often used in their exterior designs during this time period: The Minto Blank Wall




The Maplewood version above has only 1 front-facing window on the second floor per unit. The design is a melange of traditional with the shutters, but the large picture windows and the blank walls on the second floor add a sense of modernism. The version below is another take on the design with more front-facing windows.






A unique aspect of many of these designs is the location of the fireplace. When set on the inside wall space is needed for the depth of the firebox and thus they are staggered with part protruding in to the adjacent unit. As such, the fireplaces in these plans are not centred on the wall in each respective room.  


A common element with many of the bungalow semi-detached designs is that the bedrooms are at the back, and there is no access to the rear yard from the back of these houses. The Sherwood plan above appears to be a variation designed for a walk-out basement lot with a lower-level back door. The standard Sherwood plan below does not have a back door.  










This design has the "signature" blank wall common to many of Minto's semi-detached designs at the time. The resultant layout has a practical vestibule to one side that open in to a stair hall.



This design has a great modern facade with a low-slung roof line and picture windows that stretch from floor to ceiling.


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